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on who is taking part in the ceremony. a civil rights legacy lives on. stay with us. [ female announcer ] research suggests cell health plays a key role throughout our lives. one a day women's 50+ is a complete multivitamin designed for women's health concerns as we age. it has 7 antioxidants to support cell health. one a day 50+. >>> in less than two weeks, roberts will swear in president obama for his second term in office. as many as 800,000 visitors will be in washington for the inauguration. and crews are hard at work for the inaugural platform outside the capitol. it's a big day and the president set a big agenda to match it. he plans to tackle immigration, gun control, climate change, and tax reform in his second term. and with four years in office under his belt, this president knows what he wants and he's confident he'll get it. joining me now is democratic strategist margie omero and victoria defrancesco soto, a fellow at the university of texas and an msnbc contributor. thank you both for joining me tonight. >> thanks, rev. >> victoria, how does the president keep the momentu
with affirmative action, and at the time, as you may have read and not remember, the civil rights movement, martin luther king turned to full employment and poor people's campaign as the principal demand, and the johnson administration rather than coming up with full employment we spotted with affirmative action. you won't see look at the eyes on the prize or marching in the street demanding affirmative action. they were demanding full employment and trying to reach out to whites, latinos, asians, native americans, that was the vision. and she said when affirmative action happened, we knew it would only help the upper-middle-class within the black community, a very small percentage of african-americans, kids who want to go to these elite colleges, you know, that affirmative action was targeted or would benefit from. but we were scared of being read beaded and ostracized or attack so we backed down and just accepted that. he said we knew the poverty would remain in these basic issues of economic injustice would be made. i say this to say that movements can be the railed. they can be intimidated, th
which nobody would have ever predicted would end slavery 100 years later. the civil rights movement sought ups and downs. i think that it is important to always know that social movements are not simple narrative of parks of one of success after another. -- arcs of success after another. it is not about occupying space. it is about confronting the enormous challenges we face in america and the globe. if we do not confront of these changes, we will not have a future. one way of thinking about maybe the history of the abs and a flows of social movement is to say -- for those who write the demise of this movement, which there is is always a gap or you can have hope. that is the importance of the beginning of the occupy movement. it actually is a source of hope that people responded to the changes in this country that really show that there are cracks that can be exploited. and i will stop. thank you. >> ok. >> she actually took my answer. [laughter] that's what i was going to say. so, there is some good overlap. i guess i will talk a bit about my experience with occupy and start off wi
. how do we build a democratic party in the south without giving up civil rights, women's reproductive rights and build a big tent? >> i would remind us of one word, work. that's what's ahead of us. we have a path. we have seen nationally that i think the presidency favors democrats. the real work is going to be exactly where you pointed out, state legislatures. in 2010, we vis rate at the gubernatorial level. in 2010, we got killed. we have to build that back and we need to put together a concrete plan to take the house. we have to stay in the future business. by that, the republicans continue to practice the politics of subtraction. that's a losing strategy nationally. it's not impacted them locally. it's up to local democrats to say we are the one who is care about the middle class. we are the ones who don't encourage vaginal probes for women -- >> unless they want them. >> we are the ones who try to make sure african-americans have the right to vote. we are the ones who believe in the dream act. we are the ones who believe in inclusion for gay and lesbians. >> it's a messaging piec
of the spectrum. think about the civil rights movement, feminism, the various feminisms of the era, and, eventually, the gay and lesbian rights movement and other social movements that challenged the idea that there really is one male breadwinner model of the american family. when liberalism experienced those challenges, it went into a prolonged period of political crisis in the 60s and well into the 70 #s, and it's that critical historical moment that the conservative movement steps into the breach with liberalism in crisis and proposes a kind of new model of the american family, one that does not require comake support or economic assistance, but one that requires moral protection so the book really tells the story of the politicized american family going from the family that needs support economically to one that needs protection morally. that's how a characterize the shift from a liberal political culture to a more conservative political culture. the critical difference between the liberal, the previous -- the pre-1960 #s liberal model of the family and the post 1970s conservative m
senator tim scott hammered by the naacp. the group says he doesn't believe in civil rights. well, that senator is now firing back. the governor sticks around to talk about that. >> plus, getting your hands on pot could soon be a button away. next to hit stores. marijuana vending machines. [ male announcer ] kids grow up in no time... marie callender's turkey breast with stuffing is a great reason to slow down. creamy mash potatoes, homestyle gravy and 320 calories. marie callender's. it's time to savor. >> republican senator tim scott was sworn in yesterday as first african-american senator in more than three decades. slamming the newly elected lawmaker on civil rights. senator scott is firing back. listen. >> we have republicans who believe in civil rights. you know, unfortunately he is not one of them. and unfortunately his party as you know has really gone after so-called rinos as they call them. these republicans who believe in civil rights again and again. >> i think that it's tcontinue a nation. if you really think about where we are, we have the most diverse freshman class
history or extreme violent tendencies. >> you try to protect civil rights, and in this country, this comes with some level of horrific events. >>> still to come, a bombshell revelation could affect the game of football forever. a new report offers a possible answer to what killed junior seau. >>> and oscar nominations announced today. did hollywood directors leave the director of "zero dark thirty" out in the cold. at a dry cleaner, we replaced people with a machine. what? customers didn't like it. so why do banks do it? hello? hello?! if your bank doesn't let you talk to a real person 24/7, you need an ally. hello? ally bank. your money needs an ally. your doctor will say get smart about your weight. i tried weight loss plans... but their shakes aren't always made for people with diabetes. that's why there's glucerna hunger smart shakes. they have carb steady, with carbs that digest slowly to help minimize blood sugar spikes. and they have six grams of sugars. with fifteen grams of protein to help manage hunger... look who's getting smart about her weight. [ male announcer ] glucerna hung
the government being able to choose who can have a gun. >> you try to protect civil rights, and in this country, this comes with some level of horrific events. >>> still to come, a bombshell revelation could affect the game of football forever. >>> and oscar nominations announced today. did hollywood directors leave the director of "zero dark thirty" out in the cold. ? ♪ [ male announcer ] this is karen and jeremiah. they don't know it yet, but they're gonna fall in love, get married, have a couple of kids, [ children laughing ] move to the country, and live a long, happy life together where they almost never fight about money. [ dog barks ] because right after they get married, they'll find some retirement people who are paid on salary, not commission. they'll get straightforward guidance and be able to focus on other things, like each other, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. it's just common sense. [ female announcer ] some people like to pretend a flood could never happen to them. and that their homeowners insurance protects them. [ thunder crashes ] i
it's an extreme case of criminal history or extreme violent tendencies. >> you try to protect civil rights, and in this country, this comes with some level of horrific events. >>> still to come, a bombshell revelation could affect the game of football forever. a new report offers a possible answer to what killed junior seau. >>> and oscar nominations announced today. did hollywood directors leave the director of "zero dark thirty" out in the cold. (dog) larry,larry,larrryyy. why take exercise so seriously,when it can be fun? push-ups or sprints? what's wrong with fetch? or chase? let's do this larry! ooh, i got it, i got it! (narrator) the calorie-smart nutrition in beneful healthy weight... includes grains and real chicken, because a healthy dog is a playful dog. beneful healthy weight. find us on facebook to help put more play in your day. and his new boss told him two things -- cook what you love, and save your money. joe doesn't know it yet, but he'll work his way up from busser to waiter to chef before opening a restaurant specializing in fish and game from the great northwest.
to teach and practice civil rights law. and lead a voter registration drive rather than cashing in on his degree. i think those were fundamental choices for him. >> rose: and he was looking for a way to engage in public service rather than take an easy corporate route in high demand with high salary. >> i think he felt that the most rewarding life was one in which you could make a greater difference than just in your own realm, your own level of comfort. >> rose: i want to come back to him and lots of questions about him. but go back to where you are. so you are going to leave politics and just study. >> i'm going to leave campaigns. actually, it's sort of a causei academic position. because what i've done with the university of chicago is create an institute of politics much like the one at harvard and some other-- . >> rose: you mean like the kennedy school. >> well, the kennedy school is one thing. but the iop was something the kennedy school started at harvard to expose young people to practitioners in politics, to encourage them to go into the public arena as candidates, as strategis
is to protect the civil rights of homeless people. >> statewide recommendations at a uniform plan in every california city where homeless people can get health care and find a clean bathroom or a place to stay. >> we are not going to usurp any local community's local laws about it but like to provide direction for how to alleviate homelessness. >> the goal is to help the homelessness rather than criminalize them. would also include free legal representation. >>> new this morning, a shooting in san bruno puts a teenaged girl in the hospital. it happened just before 10:30 last night near the intersection of santa teresa way and park boulevard next to cappuccino high school. the san mateo county sheriff's office says the girl who was shot was 16 years old from south san francisco. right now in stable condition. no arrests have been made. >>> across the nation, several gun shows within an hour's drive from where gunman opened fire at an elementary school in connecticut have been cancelled. organizers say the shows were just not appropriate in the weeks after the gunman killed 26 people includi
of that and of the civil rights movement i was just a junkie by the time i was 9-years-old i was handing out leaflets for robert kennedy and when i was 10i made a big decision and broke with the democratic party and went to work for john lindsay running for the mayor of new york but i wouldn't work for him at the headquarters, i want to the liberal party come on new york you could run on to. i was handed out leaflets on the street corner in new york, and some woman felt this was cute this ely handing out leaflets, and she asked me why they make the case for lindsey and got an early start of my political career and made the case against the opponent as well. we to get back to the liberal party headquarters and open it up and there were all these doughnuts and a lot of $10 bills and so in one of my early lessons in politics, the district leader grabbed the money and said you can keep the doughnuts. [applause] >> you also sold a bumper stickers. >> those of us that have lived through it remember that is a time of great idealism and the campaign was infused with idealism as tragically as it ended, and wh
in on this stuff partly because of the history of what the civil rights movement faced and -- >> look, we're not a national security group. we're a freedom group and this is about freedom at the end of the day. this country, we used to be completely opposed to the government spying on your mail, but now it's online and we're apparently cool with, you can read all my e-mail and listen to all ni cell phone conversations. that's a big problem. >> although that's one thing congress did right but i'll get back to that. >> you know, the -- as far as we know, right? >> right. >> i live a few miles from the national security agency, who knows with them? but with the usa patriot act, its definition of terrorism says, if you break a law while p putting lives in danger, seeking to influence policy in the united states, you've violated the patriot act. that's like everything martin luther king did in public. >> breaking laws? law plauzbly, who knows. >> birmingham, the children's march, the march on washington, the march -- every anti-abortion protest? any time you're in the street you put people in
funded runaway slaves. she actually--some of the early landmark civil rights cases in california she funded. and then--and near the end of her life, things became even more bizarre. she was sort of connected to a very wealthy senator from--state senator from california and was taken to court and so it just becomes, you know, this saga. but as a figure, i mean, she's just inspirational and just formidable. c-span: $30, 643 pages for your book. where did you write it? >> guest: wrote it all over the world. i actually--you know, i was in north carolina after i did the initial traveling, i did some there. i went to new york where i had been living for 13 years. c-span: what were you doing in new york? >> guest: well, i taught at columbia and sarah lawrence college. i was for a year at the university--i'm sorry--at the american academy in rome, the rome prize. so that was where the bulk of it was actually completed. and oxford, mississippi, where i was a writer in residence. so i've toted around a lot of papers for a lot of years. c-span: faulkner does come up in your book. he used to liv
, fight. we are millions of people just like you. we are the longest standing civil rights organization in the u.s. of history's s patriots, prbotectors of the second amendment advocating the right to keep and bear arms. advancing the shooting sports. championing gun safety, education and training. creating a vital legacy by answering freedom's call. and we are growing stronger every day. we are the n.r.a. and the n.r.a. is you. host: that is from the n.r.a. two stories you can find online and front page of the leading newspapers. "new york times" looking at symbols of grief piling up. from the "washington post" broad strategy on guns being weighed far beyond the ban on assault weapons. they are on their websites. we will continue the conversation on the agenda ahead as lawmakers return the start of the 113th congress. president back in washington later t today. later, looking at just what members of congress earn, pensions and salary. we will have more with daniel shuman of the sunlight foundation. keeping track of other programs. good morning, nancy. >> good morning, steve. on today's
produce, it is a little murky. i'm not so sure whether you are concerned about the civil rights of the prisoners or the fact that guantanamo bay itself is something the u.s. should not keep open. -- listening to you, it is a little murky. so my question, is it closing guantanamo bay or giving justice to the people and the 186 people? when you go on that track, and everybody loses track of what is really the issue. >> i don't understand the distinction. it's not just to hold people indefinitely without. guantanamo is the symbol of that. you've got to get them out of there and close it. >> i don't want to get in an argument. >> your first point about the cost, not the economic cost that you can put a dollar figure on but the cost to america, the intangible cost. i think we saw that not long ago with the man extradited from the u.k. to america. i guess the u.k. is our closest allies in the war on terror and our closest ally made us promise that before they would extradite him we would not send them to guantanamo, that he would not be prosecuted in the military commission, which to
with on a number of issues, still many feel that gay rights like marriage equality is a civil rights issue. the "talk back" question for you today, should we welcome pastors in the public square despite their views on homosexuality. facebook.com/carolcnn, facebook.com/carolcnn. or tweet me at @carolcnn. i'll be right back. >>> good morning. thank you so much for being with us, i'm carol costello. time to check the top stories. >>> the federal government wants to give boeing's newest airline another look. the department of transportation will conduct a comprehensive review of the boeing 787 dreamlin dreamliner's critical systems including design, manufacturing, and assembly. the federal government says the aircraft are safe to fly. the 787 has had a pretty difficult week, though, incidents include a fire that started in the battery compartment of a japanese airliner and a fuel leak in another japan airlines jet. >>> afghan president hamid karzai arriving at the white house minutes ago for a one-on-one meeting with president obama. the future of u.s. troops in afghanistan topped the agenda.
'm going to speak with civil rights activist reverend jesse jackson about it next. later nbc news presidential historian michael beschloss on whether the debt ceiling could be a legacy trap. mine was earned off vietnam in 1968. over the south pacific in 1943. i got mine in iraq, 2003. usaa auto insurance is often handed down from generation to generation. because it offers a superior level of protection, and because usaa's commitment to serve the military, veterans and their families is without equal. begin your legacy, get an auto insurance quote. usaa. we know what it means to serve. starts with arthritis pain and a choice. take tylenol or take aleve, the #1 recommended pain reliever by orthopedic doctors. just two aleve can keep pain away all day. back to the news. for a professional cleansing device? join the counter revolution and switch to olay pro-x. get cleansing results as effective as a $200 system. guaranteed or your money back. olay pro-x. >>> good day to all of you. welcome to "weekends with alex witt," it's 1:00 p.m. on the east coast, 10:00 a.m. out west. new today,
in the civil rights movement. others have been working in the movement since 1961. i.t. is about it now. he had not come to baker county to help get the movement started there. but once my father, who was a leader in the community with murder, that was one thing that brought everyone together, and they were ready when they came in to help us, the baker county movement. >> wow. what's the interesting part to me is in the book you really write about the way that the legacy impacts you. so you talk about the fact that when that happened, the black children lost father by friends found themselves living in this no man's land and we didn't get the chance to really feel the price of those young folks paid in order for us to be where we are. we know it intellectually, but we don't get to see that. and that is something that the book really does beautifully. >> we started the movement in june of 1965. in august of 1965, about 15 others and my sister decided to integrate the white schools. i can remember the first day. i had graduated and was going off to college in september. and we took them -- we tri
escape from slavery. >> what? >> for the civil right's crowd -- for the -- the hip left gay marriage is -- is up from slavery in the same sense -- >> wow. >> -- of punishment or discrimination or what have you? >> i think he is off his meds. >> stephanie: karl can you translate that? >> this is right after he started comparing the push for marriage equality to some apparent push to normalize pedophilia. >> stephanie: oh right. >> rush tries to stay away from me. and elton john performed at his last -- i guess his fourth wedding, so you don't hear him talk about it too much and he is remarkably uncomfortable when he does talk about it and it doesn't always make a lot of sense. >> stephanie: oh good. speaking of not making sense it's pastor john haggy. >> the bible requirements for getting married are these. one that you marry someone of the opposite sex. and genesis 101 says god created male and female. anything else is too disturbed people playing house. [ laughter ] >> stephanie: oh! two disturbed people playing house. wow. [ laughter ] >> i would like to point
into enforcement to the extent that a lot of advocates, particularly civil rights advocates, are actually very angry about it. it's never going to be perfect. i think that that's the place where the last comment that you read comes forward. we still have people who do constantly believe that a lot of them are criminals, drugging drugs or people. nobody wants that. so the question is, how much more needs to happen on the border and inside the united states before other kinds of reforms can happen? i believe that what the administration has been trying to say for the last two years is we've done that. look at the number of people we deported, something like 400,000 people, which is more than any president ever has in the last, you know, in all of history. the border is looking much better. i've been down, i've looked at it, it's looking better, but there are still problems. the question is, is it ok? that's going to be -- there's going to be competing versions of that no matter what happens. host: here are some of those numbers. on u.s. immigrant deportations, you can see the total so far during
the u.s. from challenges under international law. but civil liberty advocates don't buy that drones are used decisions against combatants. >> the use of drones may be more precise than bombardment, but that isn't the right question that we should be asking. the question is, is the use of drones lawful in the places in which we are using them and against the people who are being killed? and the answer to that is, no. >> also controversial, double tap drone strikes in which we sometimes fire on the same area twice in a row. sometimes allegedly killing first responders, shep? >> shepard: james rosen at the state department tonight. thanks. iran is weighing in on president obama's choice for defense a second. today one iranian official says he hopes chuck hagel will help make practical changes in american foreign policy. some of his fellow republicans say they cannot and will not support hagel because of his record on israel and iran. he once made a comment about the quote jewish lobby and some of the, quote, dumb things they do. but later went on to say he supports israel in every way
of directors--in violation of the company's internal controls. i mean, that's a deliberate circumvention, right? >> it certainly sounds like it. and it certainly sounds like a good place to start a criminal investigation. >> in fact, according to a civil suit filed by the securities and exchange commission, countrywide's chief executive officer, angelo mozilo, knew as early as 2006 that a significant percentage of its subprime borrowers were engaged in mortgage fraud and that it hid this and other negative information about the quality of its loans from investors. when the case was settled out of court, the s.e.c.'s director of enforcement, robert khuzami, called mozilo "a corporate executive who deliberately disregarded his duty to investors by concealing what he saw from inside the executive suite-- a looming disaster in which countrywide was buckling under the weight of increasing risky mortgage underwriting, mounting defaults and delinquencies, and a deteriorating business model." mozilo, who admitted no wrongdoing, accepted a lifetime ban from ever serving as an officer or director of a pu
admitted that he traveled to libya several times during the civil war but has denied any connection to the benghazi attacks. so right now nobody in custody that we know for sure was involved in that attack. frustrating for u.s. officials. >> so is he still being held? >> not clear whether he's still being held. right now it looks like there's nobody in custody that we're sure was involved at least as a suspect in that attack and it's very frustrating. >> a lot of work to bring those folks to justice. brian, thanks very much. >>> lawmakers here in washington want to hear from the secretary of state hillary clinton as soon as possible about the benghazi attack. we're just learning she will now testify on capitol hill the week of january 21st. her testimony had to be rescheduled after her bout with a stomach virus, a concussion, and later a blood clot in her head. let's bring in elise labott. >> wolf, it will be the week of january 21st. president obama's inauguration is on the 20th. it may not be exactly the same day after the inauguration. the committee staffers on the senate foreign
of the 90 than it is to get 51% out of the 10. and i just, i would short your efforts right now, john. >> well i think it's a real struggle. but i don't think it's one we can give up on. because it's a huge -- i think it's the future of western civilization. these policies we're implementing today don't work. they've been proven to fail in history. countries have fallen over and over again -- >> there have been periods like this before, john? we've never had this many people on the receiving end of government in the united states. >> not in the united states. >> no. >> but i think, i do think that the republicans need a real message that's a more libertarian message. it's hard to know whether obama won over economics or whether he won over social policies. >> that everybody gets to use their own -- >> there's a lot of -- >> i understand. >> simpson bowles, alan simpson and erskine bowles, bipartisan group, they have been trying like mad to get people to pay attention to this message. they're out against today. they're going to have another time-out and the fiscal message, the bipartis
that any kind of technology that was around when you were born is right and natural. is in the natural order of things. anything that comes along and around the age of 35 is fascinating and exciting and brilliant. anything that comes along after that is best to civilization and is going to destroy humanity as we know it. i think i am very lucky in having the job that i do, because i don't have the leisure to be incredibly blessed doubt it for my childhood. that was a world that i was not part of an was unlikely to ever be a part of. the kind of coverage that we get from anybody with a cell phone, all over the world, sullivan unreliable, is still astonishing and necessary. you brought up the arab spring. it brought up real-life coverage of hurricane sandy. it is everywhere we need to be, to paraphrase some advertisement or other. it is a great, wonderful new world. the big difference is that you as the news consumer have to do the work they did not have to do before. you have to choose your pension plan, your healthcare plan, paper or plastic. you have everything thrown in your lap, and
Search Results 0 to 38 of about 39 (some duplicates have been removed)